Jun
20
June 20
Wednesday 5:00 PM
Plan to join us each Wednesday evening from June 13 - August 1 for an evening of fellowship, great food, enjoyment of nature and inspirational worship. In keeping with our summer worship theme, Life Changing Stories,each week's presiding pastor will share a favorite Bible story and the impact it has had on his or her own life.

This week, Pastor Michael Zacher will lead us in worship, preaching on the topic "God Whispered My Nme." Special music will be provided by Teresa Elsbernd, with accompaniment by Lisa Lozito. Dinner will feature BBQ pork tenderloin, mashed potatoes, roasted asparagus and blueberry cobbler with whipped cream. Naturalist Dan Kahl's class will offer "Composting Tips."

4:30 p.m. Buses leave West and 7500 York
5:00 p.m. Bus leaves Minneapolis
5:30-6:30 p.m. Dinner is served
6:30-7:00 p.m. Nature Talk
7:15-8:00 p.m. Worship
8:00 p.m. Buses depart Conferennce & Retreat Center

Bus transportation is available from both campuses and 7500 York. Reservations required for the bus and dinner. Cost for dinner is $15.00; bus is $5.00. Call the Conference & Retreat Center, 952.469.2175 or email msiems@mocrc.org.
Conference and Retreat Center ,
http://mtolivetretreat.org/programs/midweek-worship
Jun
24
June 24
Sunday 8:30 AM
This is for communion that takes place at either campus
Minneapolis: Serley Chapel
Jun
24
June 24
Sunday 9:00 AM
The Fifth Sunday after Pentecost
~Sermon: Pastor Hammersten
~Music: Jocque Warner, tenor
~Communion: 8:30am
~Sunday Church School: resumes in fall
~The Way: resumes in fall
~Nursery: 9 and 10am

Jocque Warner, tenor, lives in Minneapolis, MN, and teaches Kindergarten–5th grade general music in St. Louis Park, MN. He holds a B.M. in music education from St. Olaf College, where he was a soloist with the St. Olaf Choir. In addition to his studies at St. Olaf, he has also completed studies at Eastman School of Music, Rochester, and is currently completing a Master's degree at the College of St. Scholastica, Duluth. Mr. Warner directs the Hosanna and Chapel Choirs at Mount Olivet’s West Campus.
West: Sanctuary
Jun
24
June 24
Sunday 9:00 AM
5th Sunday after Pentecost
~Sermon: Pastor Lose
~Music: Dana Donnay, oboe
~Communion: 8:30am
~Sunday Church School: resumes in fall
~The Way: resumes in fall
~Nursery: 9,10

Dana Donnay, oboe, is a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music and also attended the University of Minnesota. She is a freelance musician who plays with many orchestras and ensembles throughout the Midwest and is a member of The Bloomington Civic Theater Orchestra, where she can be found playing flute, oboe, clarinet or saxophone. She teaches at Mount Calvary Academy of Music in Excelsior and Mount Olivet School of Music in Minneapolis.
Minneapolis: Main Sanctuary- Minneapolis Campus
Jun
27
June 27
Wednesday 5:00 PM
Plan to join us each Wednesday evening from June 13 - August 1 for an evening of fellowship, great food, enjoyment of nature and inspirational worship. In keeping with our summer worship theme, Life Changing Stories,each week's presiding pastor will share a favorite Bible story and the impact it has had on his or her own life.

This week, Pastor David Lose will lead us in worship, preaching on the topic "Quiet Confidence." Special music will be provided by principal organist Richard Owen. Dinner will feature country roasted chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, coleslaw and apple crisp with whipped cream. Naturalist Dan Kahl's class will share information on "Ther Year of the Bird."

4:30 p.m. Buses leave West and 7500 York
5:00 p.m. Bus leaves Minneapolis
5:30-6:30 p.m. Dinner is served
6:30-7:00 p.m. Nature Talk
7:15-8:00 p.m. Worship
8:00 p.m. Buses depart Conferennce & Retreat Center

Bus transportation is available from both campuses and 7500 York. Reservations required for the bus and dinner. Cost for dinner is $15.00; bus is $5.00. Call the Conference & Retreat Center, 952.469.2175 or email msiems@mocrc.org.
Conference and Retreat Center ,
http://mtolivetretreat.org/programs/midweek-worship

Dear Friends –

To paraphrase Shakespeare, “This is the summer of our discontent.” Heat indexes contributed, along with random acts of violence, as well as politics that make only a few happy. Shooting by police and shooting of police. Racism run amok. Terrorists at work at home and abroad. There is a new tragedy almost every day. It is enough to make one despair. However, these events need to be put in perspective. Listen to these words in a sermon by Nadia Bolz-Weber:
“Evil might have the news cycle. But it does not have the victory. The darkness does not get to have our hearts, it does not get to fill our minds, it does not get to steal our joy. And looking for the love, the light, the kindness in the world around us is not the same as pretending that evil isn’t evil.

 So by all means let us name evil for what it is, let’s root out the sin and racism within us, let us fight for justice, but then let us turn the cameras toward the light, lest we become so consumed by the effects of evil that we miss the chance to be kind to a stranger, and we miss the chance to stop and read to our kids and we miss the chance to notice how acts of beauty and kindness outnumber acts of evil by the thousands, because in so doing we hand evil a bigger victory than it earned when in fact it has already lost.”

Yes, there are more acts of kindness, acts of racial reconciliation, and expressions of good will than we can imagine. It is just that evil has a better press agent.

Yes, you and I can make the world a better place by how we act, speak, and by what we support, and (dare I say it?), we will make America greater by making our church greater – by strengthening our church and its ministries of mercy and compassion, education, and the character development of youth. This fall, cast your vote for a greater Mount Olivet by financially pledging and giving.

A story is told about a church-goer named William, who was promoting tithing among his fellow church members. His friend, Charlie, said to him, “With all this talk about tithing, it seems like you are trying to make us feel guilty about what we give to church.” William backed off.  Yet, this is what William wishes he had said:
“I hate to tell you this, Charlie, but you are guilty; so it is not inappropriate for you to feel guilty. Guilt feelings may be God’s way of telling you that you are doing something wrong. But here’s something else, and that is this: you are forgiven. If you do not feel forgiven, maybe you should listen to the gospel more carefully – and let that reality penetrate your feelings. And above all, the question remains the same, Charlie: guilty and forgiven, what are you going to do this year?”

Yes, Grace Changes Everything! See you in church on Rally Sunday, September 11!

Pastor Dennis Johnson
Interim Senior Pastor